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Cumming man pleads guilty to car chase crimes
Former Forsyth teacher, Dawson man gets pretrial diversion
Lindsey update

The defendant who took local law enforcement on a high-speed chase almost two years ago in Dawson County was recently sentenced in court. 

During an April 1 hearing, Joshua Warren Bush, 32, of Cumming pleaded guilty to felony possession of methamphetamine, possession of a drug-related object and obstruction of law enforcement. 

His punishment for the first count is three years of probation, and the shorter one-year punishments for the two latter counts will run concurrent with that sentence. 

In July 2020, Bush unsuccessfully tried to evade officers by driving his Toyota Camry at speeds of almost 100 miles per hour. The chase ended on Burt Creek Road, near Shoal Creek Road. Bush ran from the car and fled into the woods before later being caught. 

Back in 2017, Bush was arrested by authorities in Forsyth County for leading them on a high-speed chase in his black Mustang. His car almost hit a father driving his family in a van before law enforcement deployed a spike strip and PIT maneuver to stop the fleeing vehicle. 


Rosson receives pretrial diversion

In related news, Dawson County man and former DeSana Middle School teacher is undergoing a pretrial diversion program after he was arrested in Florida for indecent exposure.

Last September, Coby Shane Rosson, 35, was apprehended for exposing himself to multiple victims who were in a pool at a Fort Walton Beach condominium. 

Pre-trial diversion, also known as pre-trial release, is an option offered to first-time offenders charged with misdemeanor or felony offenses. 

Upon review of case records, DCN requested Rosson’s pretrial document last week and subsequently obtained an electronic version.

Rosson signed an agreement with the State of Florida to begin the 12-month program, starting on Jan. 13, 2022. The conditions for remaining in the program include that Rosson must not break the law or associate with people who do. 

He has to maintain a lawful job and attend counseling and all scheduled appointments, and he must also report monthly to Judicial Correction Services, among other conditions. 

“If the defendant successfully completes this program in accordance with the contract signed by the state and the defendant,” stated the document, “the State of Florida will file a nolle prosequi or otherwise permanently drop this case.”