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Male duo charged after allegedly stealing off-road motorcycles and posting on Facebook
Kirkpatrick Mugs
Christopher (left) and Mitchell Kirkpatrick

Two Gainesville men were recently booked after allegedly stealing two dirt bikes from a Dawson County residence. 

Christopher Shannon Kirkpatrick, 33 and Mitchell Raymond Kirkpatrick, 35, were both arrested by the Dawson County Sheriff’s Office on Friday, Oct. 15 and were each charged with one count of criminal trespass and one felony count of theft by taking.

The alleged theft occurred at a house off of Ga. 53 between Aug. 29 at 11 p.m. and the next morning at 8 a.m.. DCSO responded to the victims’ residence shortly after 10 a.m. on Aug. 30. 

The two ventured onto the owners’ property without their permission and then stole the two dirt bikes, which were in the driveway next to the garage, according to related warrants. 

These warrants describe the first bike as a red-and-white Honda CRF 100, a mid-size dirt bike with a torn seat and “#69” front license plate worth $1,300. 

The second bike was a green-and-white Kawasaki KLX 140, also a mid-size dirt bike, worth $2,100. It had neon pink handlebar grips, no chain cover and a new rear tire. 

Both are alleged to have put the dirt bikes in the bed of Christopher’s truck before leaving the premises. 

About two weeks later on Sept. 12, the warrants state that pictures of the Kawasaki bike appeared on the Facebook group “North GA Autos $1,500 or Less,” advertising the bike for sale. Mitchell was listed as the point of contact on the post. 

One of the victims identified the Kawasaki bike as his by recognizing its stickers, the handlebar grips, bent front right “fork” and its unaligned front fender with the front tire. 

After recognizing the bike, the man then contacted authorities. DCSO prepared warrants that were dated Sept. 24 and executed on Oct. 15. 

Bond for both men was set at $1,300. 

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