View Mobile Site
  • Bookmark and Share

ASK THE EXPERTS

Liming the garden

POSTED: December 28, 2011 4:00 a.m.

Proper pH of the soil is very important to plants. If the pH is low, lime may be added any time of the year.

However, since lime is slow to react, applying lime as soon as possible is important.

Soil pH strongly influences plant growth, the availability of nutrients and the activity of soil microbes.

Garden soil falls into one of three broad categories; 1. acid 2. neutral 3. alkaline.

On the pH scale, which goes from zero to 14, seven is defined as neutral (neither acidic nor alkaline) below seven is acidic and above seven is alkaline. Each unit change in the scale represents a 10fold change in acidity or alkalinity.

For example, a pH of 5.0 is 10 times more acid than a pH of 6.0.

Many gardeners know that productivity of the vegetable garden decreases as the pH falls from the range of 6.0-6.2 to 5.5 and below.

The productive potential of soil is not determined solely by its sand, clay and silt composition, but also by the interactions of its mineral, organic, chemical and biological components.

Poor vegetable performance in Georgia gardens with low pH is usually caused by aluminum or manganese toxicity (low pH "releases" excessive amounts of these elements which are usually "bound" in the soil) and/or nutrient deficiencies of calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus or molybdenum (their availability in the soil decreases as soils become more acid).

Over a period of time, Dawson County soil tends to become more acid. Rainfall, irrigation, soil erosion, crop removal and the use of the ammonium form of nitrogen all contribute to a gradual lowering of the pH.

Routine applications of liming materials will prevent and/or correct low soil pH.

The amount of lime to apply should be determined by a well calibrated lime-requirement test (the pH part of a routine soil test).

Liming recommendations indicate the number of pounds of lime needed to bring your soil pH up to the satisfactory range for crop production.

As a general rule of thumb, a pH in the range of 6.0-6.2 is best for growth of vegetables.

Usually 4-8 pounds of lime will be required for each 100 square feet of garden; however, the exact rate will vary depending on soil type, fertilization practices and previous liming history.

I will be happy to help you determine how much lime you need for your soil.

There are a number of different types of liming materials available.

Most liming materials, in addition to neutralizing soil acidity, also supply calcium and/or magnesium.

The most common liming material used in Georgia is dolomitic limestone. Dolomitic limestone sold in Georgia contains more than 6 percent elemental magnesium in addition to calcium.

Since Georgia soils are often deficient in magnesium, dolomitic limestone is usually recommended.

For additional information on lime and/or conducting a soil test, call the Dawson County Extension Office at (706) 2652442.

Clark Beusse is the Dawson County extension agent. For more information, call (706) 265-2442.

 

COMMENTS

  • Bookmark and Share

Commenting not available.
Commenting is not available.

FEATURED PHOTOS

Lady Tigers advance to Swee...
Tabitha Morrison takes a le...
Tigers fall in final minutes
Tiger Nick Murphy catches a...
Cheerleaders move to 4-0
The Dawson County High Scho...
Mentoring PALS receives don...
Beth Paul with Dawson Count...
Pumpkin patch supports arts
Art teacher John Lundy stan...
Top teacher selected
Kilough Elementary School m...
Softball region champs
The Dawson County High Scho...
Pups storm park
Julia and Lee Swift, along ...
Clinic opens doors for dent...
Phillip Bonner, Good Shephe...
Tigers take a victory
Special teams coordinator C...
 

AP VIDEO


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 Dawsonnews, Dawsonville, GA. All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...